5 behaviors setting drivers up for roadside inspections

By: Ann Potratz

Publication: Transportation Safety Training Advisor

Date Posted: 04/02/2021

Top five driver violations cited during roadside inspections in 2020

When commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers engage in risky driving behavior, they’re much more likely to be pulled over and inspected. And, as most carriers know, more inspections almost always means more violations.

A recent data snapshot from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) Analysis & Information (A & I) summarizes motor carrier and driver compliance on and off the road and CMV crashes for calendar year (CY) 2020.

The top five driver violations cited during roadside inspections in CY 2020 were primarily based on driving behavior:

Rank

Violation

1

Speeding 6-10 miles per hour over the speed limit (392.2SLLS2)

2

Failure to obey traffic control device (392.2C)

3

Failing to use seat belt while operating a CMV (392.16)

4

False report of drivers record-of-duty status (395.8E)

5

Lane restriction violation (392.2LV)

When a driver is stopped for a traffic violation, the vehicle is often also inspected. Even if officers don’t always intend to inspect every vehicle they stop, they won’t hesitate to do so if the vehicle or driver appear to be in violation. These impromptu inspections can result in costly violations that could put your drivers out of service and cost you valuable time.

The top five vehicle-related violations occurring during roadside inspections in CY 2020 include:

Rank

Violation

1

Inoperable required lamp (393.9)

2

Operating a CMV without proof of a periodic inspection (396.17C)

3

Clamp or roto-type brake out-of-adjustment (393.47E)

4

No/discharged/unsecured fire extinguisher (393.95A)

5

Inspection, repair, and maintenance of parts and accessories (396.3A1)

It’s essential to remind your drivers that safe driving habits will not only protect everyone on the road, they will also reduce the likelihood of an impromptu roadside inspection (or worse, an out-of-service designation).

Incorporate this message into your regular safety training to keep it in the forefront of your drivers’ minds.

About the author
Ann Potratz - Human Resources Editor

Ann is an editor on the Human Resources Publishing Team, she specializes in employment law issues such as discrimination, sexual harassment, background checks, terminations, and security.

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